Meet LaTasha

LaTasha Lewis is a mother of four who likes to workout while maintaining a busy work schedule. LaTasha likes the gym but loves to workout in nature from time to time. Either way, LaTasha is super-informative, funny and relatable.Feel free to join her on her fitness journey. No Excuses!

Ab Excercises for a Strong Core 

Upper Body Workouts for Sculpted Arms

How to Get Back In The Grove of Working Out After Taking a Break

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Waist Slimming Sauna Ab Sweat Band

For Him & Her

           Ab Exercises For A Strong Core

 

 

  Do each exercise (don’t forget to engage your core throughout!) for 30 seconds, resting 30 seconds between moves. You can add       these firm stomach exercises to your current fitness program or perform this separately as your core routine.

 

 Press and Resist

  • Lie face-up with knees bent and feet flat on the floor. 

  • Engage core and draw knees in toward navel, forming a 90-degree angle with knees so shins are parallel with the floor. Place palms slightly above knees on thighs. 

  • Press palms into thighs, simultaneously resisting the pressure with knees. Maintain equal balance with pressure from palms and thighs so that you keep the 90-degree angle of the knees.

Hold for 30 seconds.

 

 Helicopter 

  • Lie face-up with knees bent and feet flat on the floor, arms extended out to sides, palms down. 

  • Engage core, take a deep breath in, and draw knees into chest. 

  • Exhale, pressing lower back into floor as you extend feet toward the ceiling. (Upper torso and lower body will form a 90-degree angle with feet pressed together.) 

  • Keep core contracted, flex toes toward the floor, and begin circling legs clockwise, keeping legs fully extended and hips resting firmly on the floor. Continue for 30 seconds.

  • Then begin circling legs counter-clockwise, keeping legs fully extended and hips resting firmly on the floor.

Continue for 30 seconds.

Scale up: Flip palms up to face the ceiling to decrease stability while increasing core activity.

 

 Hands of Time 

  • Lie face-up with knees bent and feet flat on the floor, arms extended out to sides, palms down. 

  • Engage core, draw knees into chest, and press feet toward the ceiling. Feet should remain together with toes flexed. 

  • Inhale and lower right leg out to right side as far as possible, keeping left leg still. 

  • At lowest point, exhale and use core to move right leg back to starting position.

Repeat for 30 seconds. Switch sides; repeat.

 

 Round the Clock 

  • Lie face-up with knees bent and feet flat on the floor, arms extended out to sides, palms down. 

  • Engage core and draw right knee in toward navel. Flare right knee out (opening inner thigh area) and extend right leg until it is at a 45-degree angle. (Left foot should remain off the floor throughout the exercise.) 

  • Reverse direction to starting position.

Repeat for 30 seconds. Switch sides; repeat.

Make this firm stomach exercise easier: Keep the opposite knee of the extended leg bent with foot flat on the floor. 

 

 Screamers 

  • Get in a left side plank position with foreman firmly placed on the floor and hips raised off the floor. Contract and drive right knee toward navel with toe flexed. 

  • When knee reaches navel, extend right leg out in front of body at a 45-degree angle. 

  • Quickly swing leg back to starting position.

Continue reps for 30 seconds. Switch sides; repeat.

 

 Trace the Triangle

  • Get in a push-up position with hands in line with shoulders and feet hip-width apart. 

  • Engage core and reach left hand out 45 degrees as far as possible. Do the same with right hand, bringing hands side by side. 

  • Reach out right hand as far as possible in front of head. Follow with left hand. 

  • Reach backward with right hand on a 45-degree angle, following with left hand. (Your hand pattern will be as if you just traced a triangle.) Reverse direction through each step. 

Continue, alternating directions for 30 seconds.​

                         

 

       Upper Body Workouts For Sculpted Arms

Ready to get started? Here are 20 arm exercises without weights you can do at home to help build your upper-body and core strength, all in one.

 Plank Tap

  • Start in a high plank with your palms flat, hands shoulder-width apart, shoulders stacked directly above your wrists, legs extended behind you, and your core and glutes engaged.

  • Tap your right hand to your left shoulder while engaging your core and glutes to keep your hips as still as possible.

  • Do the same thing with your left hand to right shoulder. That's 1 rep.

  • Continue, alternating sides.

  • To make this easier, try separating your legs a little more.

Targets the deltoids, latissimus dorsi, triceps, glutes, and core.

 Side Plank

  • Lie on your right side with your right hand directly underneath your right shoulder. Extend your legs and stack your left foot on top of your right, and then squeeze your abs and glutes to lift your hips off the floor. Extend your left hand straight up toward the ceiling.

  • Hold here for a set amount of time.

Targets the the core (especially the obliques), latissimus dorsi, and deltoids.

 Forearm Plank Reach Out

  • Start in a forearm plank position, with your elbows directly under your shoulders, hands facing forward so your forearms are parallel, core engaged, hips level, and legs extended straight behind you.

  • From this position, reach your right hand forward and tap the floor in front of you. Return your right hand to your starting position, and then reach forward with your left hand to tap the floor in front of you.

  • Continue to alternate sides as you focus on keeping your hips steady throughout.

  • Make it easier: If this exercise feels too challenging, take your feet wider then hip-width apart. The wider your feet, the easier the move should be.

Targets deltoids, latissimus dorsi, core, and glutes

 Plank Up-Down

  • Start in a high plank with your palms flat, hands shoulder-width apart, shoulders stacked directly above your wrists, legs extended behind you, and your core and glutes engaged. Place your feet hip-width apart.

  • Lower your left arm so that your forearm is on the floor. Then, do the same with your right so that you're in a forearm plank.

  • Reverse to return to a high plank. That's 1 rep.

  • As you move, keep your hips as still as possible. To make this easier, try widening your legs a little more.

Targets the deltoids, latissimus dorsi, triceps, glutes, and core.

 Push-up

  • Start in a high plank with your palms flat, hands shoulder-width apart, shoulders stacked directly above your wrists, legs extended behind you, and your core and glutes engaged.

  • Bend your elbows and lower your chest to the floor. Drop to your knees if needed.

  • Push through the palms of your hands to straighten your arms. That's 1 rep.

Targets the core, pectorals, deltoids, and triceps.

 Bodyweight Triceps Dip

  • Sit on the floor with your knees bent and feet in front of you, resting on your heels. Place your palms on the floor behind you underneath your shoulders, fingers facing toward your body.

  • Straighten your arms to lift your butt, then bend your elbows to lower yourself without sitting down completely. That's 1 rep.

  • Keep your heels on the floor and your elbows pointing directly behind your body (not flared out to the side).

Targets the triceps and pecs.

 How to Get Back in The Grove of Working Out

 

 

There are some things to think about when you're easing back into a workout routine whether you've been taking a break for the past couple of weeks, months, or even years.

 Don't Overdo It Right Away

"Doing too much too soon can overwhelm you mentally." "And a rigorous routine may eventually feel like too much to deal with, which in return make you feel defeated." Understand that you're probably not going to be as fit as you were, and that's OK. You can start with just 10 minutes a day, the goal is just to get moving more. "People have a tendency to overdo it initially, and they end up [with injuries] because the body is not prepared for the extra activity." "Low-intensity workouts are a good way to reintroduce the body to activity, frequency, and duration." After a week or two, you can bump up the intensity, she says, as long as you're not losing form.

  Begin With What Works for You

Do you only feel comfortable committing to one day a week initially? Great! Mark it on your calendar and stick with it. Don't feel like you have to immediately start logging five to six gym workouts per week. "You can't get to three to four days a week without mastering day one, so just start.". As you get comfortable, try to work your way up to four days a week. "The body responds to consistency over time, so your results will come much faster if you can keep a regular pattern and frequency."

 Don't Forget to Take Those Rest Days

Another reason not to jump into a six-days-a-week workout routine: Recovery is part of being active. "When you take a day off, your body isn't. It's actually working very hard to repair and replenish itself after all the work you put it through.""Rest days are key to long-term wellness. This is a lifestyle you're creating now, so be realistic about your frequency."

 Spend a Few Minutes Stretching

Speaking of tightness, stretching is especially important when you're getting back into a fitness routine. A good warm-up includes dynamic stretches. And when you are done working out, finish with some more stretches.

 Take it Slow and Focus On Your Form

Quality trumps quantity, especially when you're just getting back into fitness. "Slow down.". "Be deliberate and conscious of your movements. Take the time to focus on your form, on your breathing, on your control." This is extra important because proper technique and form are crucial for avoiding injury.

 Finally Don't Forget to Listen to Your Body

Chances are, your body is going to let you know that it's working hard, but learn the difference between hurts-so-good and hurts-not-so-good. "If something feels weird or gives you pain, stop doing whatever that is." "There's actually a not-so-fine line between muscle discomfort from a good workout, and pain lets you know something’s not right."

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